The BRC has a strong commitment to our graduate and undergraduate students and offers many courses which reflect the diverse range of research intrests of its members. Courses taught by BRC faculty members are offered in departments including, Biological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Forest Resources & Environmental Sciences, Exercise Science & Health, Mechanical Engineering - Engineering Mechanics, and Physics.

BL3310 Environmental Microbiology (Spring)
General principles of microbiology, focusing on both the use and control of microorganisms. Topics include microbial structure, function, growth, metabolism, and diversity, as well as microbial involvement in water and waste treatment, waterborne diseases, and pollution control.
Credits: 3.0

BL4030 Molecular Biology (Fall)
Molecular biology of gene structure, expression and regulation. Also topics covering various molecular techniques and applications of these techniques and biotechnology.
Credits: 3.0

BL4120 Environmental Remediation Toxicology (Fall, Spring alternate years)
Toxicology of major environmental pollutants, their dose-response relationships and fundamentals of environmental remediation. Topics include physical, chemical, and biological remediation methods and effect of environmental toxins on biological systems. Laboratory will involve the application of chemical and biological remediation techniques.
Credits: 3.0

BL4220 Applied Industrial Microbiology (Spring, alternate years)
Discussion of microbial involvement in areas such as industrial production processes, biodeterioration, and organic and inorganic waste treatment. Also reviews current literature in these areas.
Credits: 3.0

BL4370 Cell Biology (Spring)
Celebration of the commonalities of life as exhibited in the basic building block of organisms - the cell. Course topics include details of basic genetic mechanisms, cell structure and function, and an examination of cells in their social context.
Credits: 3.0

BL4840 Molecular Biology Techniques (Fall)
Laboratory techniques in molecular biology, including methods of recombinant DNA technology for identification, cloning, and characterization of genes.
Credits: 3.0

BE3500 Biomedical Materials (Fall)
An overview of biomaterials in three basic classes: metals, ceramics, and polymers. Topics include biomaterials used in special medical applications (such as tissue replacement, absorbable and non-absorbable sutures, and soft tissue replacements) as well as discussion of tissue, body, and blood response to implants (bio-compatibility).
Credits: 3.0

BE3750 Human Biomechanics (Spring)
Introduction to the analysis of anatomical structures, movements, and mechanics of the musculoskeletal system, including properties and strength of materials. Includes application of Newtonian mechanics, statics, and strength of materials of bone, muscle, tendon, and other biologic materials. Credit may not be received for both BE3750 and MEEM4180.
Credits: 3.0

BE4100 Cell and Tissue Mechanics (Fall)
Focuses on mechanical behavior and adaptation of musculoskeletal tissues including material properties, viscoelasticity, fatigue and failure. Includes the role of mechanical forces in the development, growth and adaptation of musculoskeletal tissues; cell biology and cellular mechanotransduction.
Credits: 3.0

BE4300 Polymeric Biomaterials (Spring alternate years)
A specialized study of polymers used in biomedical engineering. Topics include: processing-structure-properties relationships for polymers, polymer fibers and composites, degradation of polymers, and medical applications for polymeric biomaterials.
Credits: 3.0

BE4700 Biosensors (Fall)
This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of biosensor development and applications. It provides an understanding of biological components, immobilization methods, transducers, and fabrication techniques.
Credits: 3.0

BE4930 Industrial & Clinical Issues (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Biomedical engineering courses will be offered on new or emerging technical subjects depending on student demand and faculty interest and expertise.
Credits: variable to 6.0

CE5300 Advanced Transport Phenomena (Spring)
Single- and multi-component mass, energy, and momentum transport. Derivation and use of the general transport equations for Newtonian and non-Newtonian flows, convective flows, and mass transport in flowing systems. Applications to complex systems.
Credits: 3.0

CE5900 Lit Microdevice Electrokinetic (On Demand)
A discussion of chemical engineering topics of current interest not included in regular graduate courses.
Credits: variable to 3.0

CH3541 Biophysical Chemistry (Spring)
Examines fundamental physical principles underlying complex biological systems in order to understand the interactions and behaviors found in biological, biochemical, and physical systems. Topics include macromolecules in aqueous environments, spectroscopy and structure determination, kinetics, membranes, and transport phenomena.
Credits: 3.0

CH4120 Pharm Chemistry: Drug Design (Fall)
Focuses on the important concepts in the design and synthesis of drugs. Rational basis for drug design including synthetic, computational and biochemical concepts will be discussed. Topics include structure-activity relationships, synthesis and reaction mechanism, and case studies of drugs.
Credits: 3.0

CH4620 Polymer Chemistry (Fall, Spring)
Study of polymer chemistry dealing with the mechanisms of polymerization and copolymerization. Study of the chemistry of polymers, including polymer modification and degradation. Topics include methods for measuring and predicting the path of degradation and stabilization.
Credits: 3.0

CH4690 Nanoparticles/Nanocomposites (On Demand)
Advanced study in special areas of polymer science. Topics could include thermal analysis, polymer surface science, advanced polymerization processes, scaling laws, etc. Some topics may include a laboratory component.
Credits: variable to 3.0

CH5420 Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reaction Mechanics (on demand)
Advanced study of mechanistic organic and physical organic chemistry intended to bring the student to the level of current research activity. Topics may include methods for determining organic reaction mechanisms, chemical bonding as it applies to organic compounds, structure-reactivity relationships, molecular rearrangements, and molecular orbital theory.
Credits: 3.0

CH6790 Protein Folding & Modification (On Demand)
Advanced study in special areas of biochemistry and molecular biology. Topics could include bioorganic chemistry, signal transduction or transcriptional control.
Credits: variable to 3.0

EH1500 Foundations of Kinesiology (Spring)
Introduces academic subdisciplines of kinesiology - anatomy, motor behavior, biomechanics, physiology, exercise and the environment, sport nutrition and the mind and brain in exercise. Provides the conceptual framework within which the scientific bases for movement during exercise, sport performance, and other forms of physical activity are studied.
Credits: 3.0

FW4099 Programming Skills for Bioinformatics (Fall alternate years)
Students will learn computer programming skills in Perl for processing genomic sequences and gene expression data and become familiar with various bioinformatics resources. The students will use real sequence and expression data and develop computer programs to solve real problems.
Credits: 3.0

EH4211 Exercise Physiology (Fall)
Focuses on the functional changes brought by acute and chronic exercise sessions. Topics include muscle structure and function, bioenergetics, cardiovascular and respiratory adaptations, exercise training for sport, sport nutrition, ergogenic aids, and other health and fitness topics.
Credits: 3.0

FW4250 Wolves & Moose of Isle Royale (Fall)
Wolves and moose have been studied for 50 years on Isle Royale, a wilderness island in Lake Superior. The instructor leads this research and uses the research to explain predation, population dynamics, conservation genetics, and other ecological principles. Not open to students with credit in FW4240.
Credits: 2.0

FW4260 Population Ecology (Fall)
Covers the principles of population ecology. Topics include measures of populations, population dynamics, and models used to describe the theories related to population dynamics.
Credits: 3.0

FW4610 Wildlife Ecology (Fall)
Covers the ecological basis for management of wildlife, including biological and sociological factors that influence management.
Credits: 3.0

FW 5180 Conservation Ethics (Fall)
Discusses relationship between ecological science and environmental ethics as it relates to natural resource management.
Credits: 2.0

FW5340 Forest Genetics and Genomics (Spring)
This course will teach fundamental and applied genetic principles that are essential for management of forest and other ecosystems to maintain their long-term health and sustainability. The class will cover the following topics: structure and function of DNA, inheritance, molecular evolution, population and quantitative genetics, gene conservation, genomics and biotechnology.
Credits: 3.0

MA5750 Statistical Genetics (Fall alternate years)
Application of statistical methods to solve problems in genetics such as locating genes. Topics include basic concepts of genetics, linkage analysis and association studies of family data, association tests based on population samples (for both qualitative and quantitative traits), gene mapping methods based on family data and population samples.
Credits: 3.0

ME5990 Nanotechnology (Fall)
The course covers fundamentals of nanoscience (synthesis, properties, characterization) and recent technological advances in renewable energy, biotechnology, and nanodevices. This course is appropriate for students with backgrounds in mechanical engineering, materials science, chemistry, chemical engineering, civil engineering, and physics.
Credits: 3.0

PH2400 University Physics IV-Waves/Modern Physics (Fall, Spring)
A calculus-based introduction to waves and modern physics. Topics include interference and diffraction, special relativity, photons and matter waves, the Bohr atom, wave mechanics, atomic physics, molecular and solid-state physics, and nuclear physics.
Credits: 3.0